Savitri’s Resolve, pp 434-436 (SH224)

Savitri Class in Hindi with Alok Pandey. Savitri Book Six : The Book of Fate, Canto One : The Word of Fate

 


 

The Queen and human mother of Savitri has spoken her apprehensions and her fears. She has given her advice, an advice rational and practical, something that most human beings are likely to make, given the prophesy. Who would knowingly dare death and wrestle with adverse Fate if one can avert it? But Savitri is made of another mettle. She is armed with another Wisdom and Strength. The prophesy of death only steels her resolve further and makes her will even more firm.

Thou who art human, think not like a god.
For man, below the god, above the brute,
Is given the calm reason as his guide;
He is not driven by an unthinking will
As are the actions of the bird and beast;
He is not moved by stark Necessity
Like the senseless motion of inconscient things.

The giant’s and the Titan’s furious march
Climbs to usurp the kingdom of the gods
Or skirts the demon magnitudes of Hell;
In the unreflecting passion of their hearts
They dash their lives against the eternal Law
And fall and break by their own violent mass:
The middle path is made for thinking man.

To choose his steps by reason’s vigilant light,
To choose his path among the many paths
Is given him, for each his difficult goal
Hewn out of infinite possibility.

Leave not thy goal to follow a beautiful face.

Only when thou hast climbed above thy mind
And liv’st in the calm vastness of the One
Can love be eternal in the eternal Bliss
And love divine replace the human tie.

There is a shrouded law, an austere force:
It bids thee strengthen thy undying spirit;
It offers its severe benignancies
Of work and thought and measured grave delight
As steps to climb to God’s far secret heights.

Then is our life a tranquil pilgrimage,
Each year a mile upon the heavenly Way,
Each dawn opens into a larger Light.
Thy acts are thy helpers, all events are signs,
Waking and sleep are opportunities
Given to thee by an immortal Power.

So canst thou raise thy pure unvanquished spirit,
Till spread to heaven in a wide vesper calm,
Indifferent and gentle as the sky,
It greatens slowly into timeless peace.”

But Savitri replied with steadfast eyes:

“My will is part of the eternal Will,
My fate is what my spirit’s strength can make,
My fate is what my spirit’s strength can bear;
My strength is not the Titan’s; it is God’s.

I have discovered my glad reality
Beyond my body in another’s being:
I have found the deep unchanging soul of love.

Then how shall I desire a lonely good,
Or slay, aspiring to white vacant peace,
The endless hope that made my soul spring forth
Out of its infinite solitude and sleep?

My spirit has glimpsed the glory for which it came,
The beating of one vast heart in the flame of things,
My eternity clasped by his eternity
And, tireless of the sweet abysms of Time,
Deep possibility always to love.

This, this is first, last joy and to its throb
The riches of a thousand fortunate years
Are poverty. Nothing to me are death and grief
Or ordinary lives and happy days.

And what to me are common souls of men
Or eyes and lips that are not Satyavan’s?

I have no need to draw back from his arms
And the discovered paradise of his love
And journey into a still infinity.

Only now for my soul in Satyavan
I treasure the rich occasion of my birth:
In sunlight and a dream of emerald ways
I shall walk with him like gods in Paradise.

If for a year, that year is all my life.

And yet I know this is not all my fate
Only to live and love awhile and die.

For I know now why my spirit came on earth
And who I am and who he is I love.
I have looked at him from my immortal Self,
I have seen God smile at me in Satyavan;
I have seen the Eternal in a human face.”

Then none could answer to her words. Silent
They sat and looked into the eyes of Fate.

Savitri: 434 – 436

END OF BOOK SIX, CANTO ONE

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