Recollections of the Nov 24, 1926 Events by Rajani Kanta Palit

 

On the 24th at about 4 p.m. I had gone to the Ashram and was meditating in Bejoy Nag’s room… A great Power was trying to descend but it seemed to me that I should be broken into pieces—so intense was the pressure of the Higher Force over my head and so great the resistance in my head. The result was that I could not receive the Power, although I tried to do so.

At about 5 p.m., Amrita was called upstairs and he came down with the Mother’s express direction that all the disciples were to assemble in the upstairs verandah for Sri Aurobindo’s blessings.

As soon as I heard this I went to Barinda’s room and told him that the long expected Descent must have taken place.

The Mother’s wishes were communicated to all the disciples including those staying in the Guest House. But many had gone out to the sea-side for their evening stroll and some had gone to play football.

So messengers were sent to call them and, when all of us had assembled in the Ashram, we went upstairs at about 6.30 p.m…. On the wall, near the central door, was hung a black silk curtain with a Chinese Dragon in gold lace-work.

The bent-wood chairs in which we used to sit for meditation were all removed and replaced by mats spread on the floor.

Absolute silence prevailed and the verandah was full of Spiritual Light. Automatically we got into a state of meditation, waiting for the arrival of the Master.

A few minutes after, at about 7 p.m., the door behind the curtain opened and the Mother and the Master appeared—the Master with his majestic gait and the Mother in her queenly bearing. The Master was dressed in a silk dhoti and chaddar, and the Mother in a silk sari. The Master took his seat in his usual low cushioned chair and the Mother on his foot-rest which was placed on this day a little to the left.

The Master looked absolutely grand, omniscient, omnipotent, Samrāt, as if the Emperor of the Universe, head lion-like, eyes wide-open as if looking from far beyond, detached yet supporting the entire universe; absolutely powerful, yet compassionate and kind to all, the supreme Godhead, absolutely Svarāt, one who had conquered himself entirely and had established his Ananda and light in every part and each cell of his body, from head to foot, his whole body radiating light and love and bliss to all creation.

The Mother was the embodiment of Love, Compassion, Purity, Beauty, Youth, Grace and Rhythm. She also looked majestic, her beaming eyes full of compassion for the earthly creation, Mother of the universe, Shakti of the Master.

It was a very auspicious day, since on this day Sri Krishna, who is the Anandamaya and who supports the evolution, descended into the physical. Sri Aurobindo embodied the Supreme Godhead on this day.

The Master held out his left hand a few inches above the head of the Mother and he blessed the disciples who had assembled with his right hand as they bowed down to him and the Mother, one by one; some of his disciples bowed more than once.

There was absolutely no talk, no sound. Neither the Mother nor Sri Aurobindo spoke a word, the atmosphere was charged with utter calmness and peace and bliss, perfect silence reigned throughout the function. Then after about half an hour or so, Sri Aurobindo and the Mother withdrew and went within.

Now Datta came out, inspired, and declared, “The Master has conquered death, decay, disease, hunger, and sleep.” We were spellbound and unable to move for some time. We felt as if we had been transported to heaven. Then we came downstairs, probably one by one.

Regarding myself, I spoke to Barinda for a special interview with the Mother, since the Pressure was very great, more than I could bear.

The Mother saw me at about 9 p.m. and I bowed down to Her and told Her about my difficulties. She assured me that it would be o.k. and blessed me.

Then there was the usual distribution of “Soup” by the Mother.

Sri Aurobindo “retired” either on the following day or one or two days after.’


This text was originally published in Mother India from Dec 1962, pp. 27-28, and more recently appeared as part of a collection on Siddhi Day at the Overman Foundation website.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email