1.12 Three Outstanding Features of the Integral Yoga

…. the divine Power in us uses all life as the means of this integral Yoga. Every experience and outer contact with our world-environment, however trifling or however disastrous, is used for the work, and every inner experience […] becomes a step on the path to perfection.

1.11 The Method We Have to Pursue

Certainly, this is no short cut or easy sadhana. […] For it implies three stages of which only the last can be wholly blissful or rapid,—the attempt of the ego to enter into contact with the Divine, the […] preparation of the whole lower Nature by the divine working to receive and become the higher Nature, and the eventual transformation.

1.10 Tantra

[…] here still exists in India a remarkable Yogic system which is in its nature synthetical and starts from a great central principle of Nature, a great dynamic force of Nature; but it is a Yoga apart, not a synthesis of other schools. This system is the way of the Tantra.

1.9 Karmayoga

The Path of Works aims at the dedication of every human activity to the supreme Will. It begins by the renunciation of all egoistic aim for our works, all pursuit of action for an interested aim or for the sake of a worldly result. By this renunciation it so purifies the mind and the will …

1.8 Bhaktiyoga

The principle of Bhakti Yoga is to utilise all the normal relations of human life into which emotion enters and apply them […] to the joy of the All-Loving, the All-Beautiful and the All-Blissful. Worship and meditation are used only for the preparation and increase of intensity of the divine relationship.

1.7 Jnanayoga

The Path of Knowledge aims at the realisation of the unique and supreme Self. … as ordinarily followed, (it) leads to the rejection of the phenomenal worlds from the consciousness as an illusion and the final immergence without return of the individual soul in the Supreme.

1.6 Rajayoga

By the practice of truth, by renunciation of all forms of egoistic seeking, by abstention from injury to others, by purity, by constant meditation and inclination to the divine Purusha who is the true lord of the mental kingdom, a pure, glad, clear state of mind and heart is established.

1.5 Hathayoga

The chief processes of Hathayoga are asana and prayama. By its numerous asanas or fixed postures it first cures the body of that restlessness which is a sign of its inability to contain without working them off in action and movement the vital forces poured into it from the universal Life-Ocean, gives to it an extraordinary health, force and suppleness …

1.4 All Life is Yoga

No synthesis of Yoga can be satisfying which does not, in its aim, reunite God and Nature in a liberated and perfected human life […].
The true and full object and utility of Yoga can only be accomplished when […] we can once more, looking out both on the path and the achievement, say in a more perfect and luminous sense: “All life is Yoga.”

1.3 Yogic Methods and Science

Yogic methods have something of the same relation to the customary psychological workings of man as has the scientific handling of the force of electricity or of steam to their normal operations in Nature.

1.1 The Emergence of Indian yoga

Indian Yoga, in its essence a special action or formulation of certain great powers of Nature, itself specialised, divided and variously formulated, is potentially one of these dynamic elements of the future life of humanity.